Favourites from the Royal Pavilion Gardens – Fuchsia magellanica alba

Fuchsia magellanica alba
Fuchsia magellanica alba

Charles Plumier named the Fuchsia in 1702 in honour of the renowned botanist Leonhart Fuchs whose work on medicinal plants, published in 1542, he much admired.

Fuchsia magellanica alba
Fuchsia magellanica alba

This was one of Plumier’s finds that he brought back to Paris from his travels in the Americas where he had been searching for new species. It was first reported in England in the Botanical Magazine in 1789, so was well established here when the Royal Pavilion was built.

Our Fuchsia is a native of Chile and Argentina and is the plant from which many modern hardy Fuchsias have been bred. It can grow to the size of a small tree if allowed, and flowers freely from June to the first frosts, or even longer if we’re lucky with the weather, as it’s hardy to –5C.

Fuchsia magellanica alba
Fuchsia magellanica alba

Such a pretty plant, with its lovely drooping tassels, the ordinary Fuchsia magellanica has red and purple flowers, and we have several of these in the gardens. But the variety alba has the sweetest pale pink colouring, very subtle and delicate, an absolute delight. It looks extremely exotic, fitting perfectly in the Pavilion planting. Look in the bed close to the Dome to see a magnificent specimen, with a second, smaller bush in the bed at the centre of the footpaths.

Volunteer Gardener, Royal Pavilion Gardens

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