The Teapot Prince at the Royal Pavilion – Tickets on sale

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Royal Pavilion, Brighton – 19 –21 June 2022

An exciting new ballet from New York is to be performed in the exotic surroundings of the Royal Pavilion Music Room in June.

Visitors will enjoy a unique experience of a dance event in the stunning Music Room of the Royal Pavilion for the first time ever.

The Teapot Prince is a reimagining of The Ballet des Porcelains bringing to life a story of magic, desire and exotic entanglement.

Created by Meredith Martin, professor of art history at New York University, and Phil Chan, choreographer and co-founder of Final Bow for Yellowface, The Teapot Prince is based on an Orientalist fairy tale.

The dance challenges traditional depictions of Asian people in ballet who are often portrayed as ridiculous or evil.

The original Ballet des Porcelains which influenced famous works such as Sleeping Beauty and The Nutcracker can be seen as an allegory for the European desire to know and steal the secrets of Chinese porcelain manufacture. In the new work, the narrative is flipped. The protagonists are now Chinese, and the Sorcerer is an obsessed European porcelain collector.

The performances will be accompanied by talks and discussions to showcase the ballet and the importance of Chinese porcelain when the Royal Pavilion was designed.

Tickets include entrance to the Royal Pavilion.

Hedley Swain, Chief Executive of Royal Pavilion and Museums Trust said: “We are completely delighted to be bringing The Teapot Prince to Brighton and the Royal Pavilion. The Music Room provides a perfect setting, and this is part of a process whereby we want once again to see the Royal Pavilion at the centre of Brighton creativity where the very best artists from around the world can be seen in this unique venue.”

Phil Chan said: “I look forward to sharing this reimagined ballet with Brighton audiences and challenging the singular Eurocentric view of “Chinese” people and culture that have continued to be performed unquestioned in the Western arts canon. In this current moment when Asians living in the minority are being subject to heightened levels of attacks, our ballet begs audiences to see us with nuance and humanity.”