High Weald Roman Coin Hoard Coming to Brighton Museum

“It was nearly dark. It was winter, it was cold and raining. These things came out of the ground stuck together with clay; first two coins stuck together then in bunches of 80 and 100 and then a pot with the final 1,000. I stuffed every pocket and staggered back to my car. It was a wonderful day.”

Tim Symonds, Finder of the High Weald Hoard

The High Weald Hoard
The High Weald Hoard

The Royal Pavilion & Museums has successfully acquired a unique and rare Roman coin hoard. The hoard and its pottery container were acquired with a grant awarded by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

Obverse side of Cornelia Supera coin
Obverse side of Cornelia Supera coin

The hoard was discovered by a metal detectorist in the High Weald in 2006, about 30 miles north west of Brighton. It is one of the largest hoards of Roman coins ever found in the county and its discovery on the edge of the Weald, where finds from the Roman period are rare, reveals further insight into the archaeology of the area, and perhaps represents a connection with the local iron industry during this period.

Reverse side of Cornelia Supera coin
Reverse side of Cornelia Supera coin

The coins date from the third century AD. Of the 2,895 silver coins found are two of special significance: the third coin of Tranquillina (wife of Gordian III), and only the second coin of Cornelia Supera (wife of Aemilian),  found anywhere in the country.

The hoard, buried for nearly 1800 years, will now go on display in Brighton Museum in the Summer.

Heather York, Curator (Local History)


Can you help us?

  • What type of questions would you like answered in the display?
  • What amazing facts would you like to find out about the coins and Roman Sussex?
  • If you could ask the finder a question about the discovery of the hoard, what would it be?

Please reply to this blog with your questions and we will try to answer them in the display.

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